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Fgf-driven Tbx protein activities directly induce myf5 and myod to initiate zebrafish myogenesis

Osborn, DPS; Li, K; Cutty, SJ; Nelson, AC; Wardle, FC; Hinits, Y; Hughes, SM (2020) Fgf-driven Tbx protein activities directly induce myf5 and myod to initiate zebrafish myogenesis. Development, 147. dev184689. ISSN 0950-1991 https://doi.org/10.1242/dev.184689
SGUL Authors: Osborn, Daniel Peter Sayer

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Abstract

Skeletal muscle derives from dorsal mesoderm formed during vertebrate gastrulation. Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signalling cooperates with Tbx transcription factors to promote dorsal mesoderm formation, but their role in myogenesis has been unclear. Using zebrafish, we show that dorsally derived Fgf signals act through Tbx16 and Tbxta to induce slow and fast trunk muscle precursors at distinct dorsoventral positions. Tbx16 binds to and directly activates the myf5 and myod genes, which are required for commitment to myogenesis. Tbx16 activity depends on Fgf signalling from the organiser. In contrast, Tbxta is not required for myf5 expression, but binds a specific site upstream of myod that is not bound by Tbx16 and drives (dependent on Fgf signals) myod expression in adaxial slow precursors, thereby initiating trunk myogenesis. After gastrulation, when similar muscle cell populations in the post-anal tail are generated from tailbud, declining Fgf signalling is less effective at initiating adaxial myogenesis, which is instead initiated by Hedgehog signalling from the notochord. Our findings suggest a hypothesis for ancestral vertebrate trunk myogenic patterning and how it was co-opted during tail evolution to generate similar muscle by new mechanisms.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2020. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0 This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided that the original work is properly attributed.
Keywords: 06 Biological Sciences, 11 Medical and Health Sciences
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute (MCS)
Journal or Publication Title: Development
ISSN: 0950-1991
Dates:
DateEvent
14 February 2020Accepted
28 April 2020Published
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
G1001029Medical Research Councilhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265
MR/N021231/1Medical Research Councilhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265
PG/14/12/30664British Heart Foundationhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000274
PG/13/19/30059British Heart Foundationhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000274
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/111674
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1242/dev.184689

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