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Development of a structured clinical pharmacology review for specialist support for management of complex polypharmacy in primary care.

Threapleton, CJD; Kimpton, JE; Carey, IM; DeWilde, S; Cook, DG; Harris, T; Baker, EH (2020) Development of a structured clinical pharmacology review for specialist support for management of complex polypharmacy in primary care. Br J Clin Pharmacol. ISSN 1365-2125 https://doi.org/10.1111/bcp.14243
SGUL Authors: Harris, Teresa Jane

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Abstract

Polypharmacy is widespread and associated with medication-related harms, including adverse drug reactions, medication errors and poor treatment adherence. General practitioners and pharmacists cite limited time and training to perform effective medication reviews for patients with complex polypharmacy, yet no specialist referral mechanism exists. AIMS: To develop a structured framework for specialist review of primary care patients with complex polypharmacy. METHODS: We developed the Clinical Pharmacology Structured Review (CPSR) and Stopping By Indication Tool (SBIT). We tested these in an age-sex stratified sample of 100 people with polypharmacy aged 65-84 years from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, an anonymised primary care database. Simulated medication reviews based on electronic records using the CPSR and SBIT were performed. We recommended medication changes or review to optimise treatment benefits, reduce risk of harm or reduce treatment burden. RESULTS: Recommendations were made for all patients, for almost half (4.8±2.4) of existing medicines (9.8±3.1), most commonly stopping a drug (1.7±1.3/patient) or reviewing with patient (1.4±1.2/patient). At least one new medicine (0.7±0.9) was recommended for 51% patients. Recommendations predominantly aimed to reduce harm (44%). There was no relationship between number of recommendations made and time since last primary care medication review. We identified a core set of clinical information and investigations (polypharmacy workup) that could inform a standard screen prior to specialist review. CONCLUSIONS: The CPSA, SBIT and polypharmacy workup could form the basis of a specialist review for patients with complex polypharmacy. Further research is needed to test this approach in patients in general practice.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Threapleton, CJD, Kimpton, JE, Carey, IM, et al. Development of a structured clinical pharmacology review for specialist support for management of complex polypharmacy in primary care. Br J Clin Pharmacol. 2020, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1111/bcp.14243. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
Keywords: clinical pharmacology, drug utilization, frailty, long term conditions, medication review, prescribing, primary care, quality use of medicines, Pharmacology & Pharmacy, 1115 Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Population Health Research Institute (INPH)
Journal or Publication Title: Br J Clin Pharmacol
ISSN: 1365-2125
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
16 March 2020Published Online
4 January 2020Accepted
Publisher License: Publisher's own licence
PubMed ID: 32058606
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/111692
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1111/bcp.14243

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