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The effect of moving to East Village, the former London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games Athletes' Village, on mode of travel (ENABLE London study, a natural experiment)

Limb, ES; Procter, DS; Cooper, AR; Page, AS; Nightingale, CM; Ram, B; Shankar, A; Clary, C; Lewis, D; Cummins, S; et al. Limb, ES; Procter, DS; Cooper, AR; Page, AS; Nightingale, CM; Ram, B; Shankar, A; Clary, C; Lewis, D; Cummins, S; Ellaway, A; Giles-Corti, B; Whincup, PH; Rudnicka, AR; Cook, DG; Owen, CG (2020) The effect of moving to East Village, the former London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games Athletes' Village, on mode of travel (ENABLE London study, a natural experiment). International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 17. p. 15. ISSN 1479-5868 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-0916-0
SGUL Authors: Limb, Elizabeth Sarah Nightingale, Claire Shankar, Aparna Whincup, Peter Hynes Rudnicka, Alicja Regina Cook, Derek Gordon Owen, Christopher Grant

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Abstract

Background Interventions to encourage active modes of travel (walking, cycling) may improve physical activity levels, but longitudinal evidence is limited and major change in the built environment / travel infrastructure may be needed. East Village (the former London 2012 Olympic Games Athletes Village) has been repurposed on active design principles with improved walkability, open space and public transport and restrictions on residential car parking. We examined the effect of moving to East Village on adult travel patterns. Methods One thousand two hundred seventy-eight adults (16+ years) seeking to move into social, intermediate, and market-rent East Village accommodation were recruited in 2013–2015, and followed up after 2 years. Individual objective measures of physical activity using accelerometry (ActiGraph GT3X+) and geographic location using GPS travel recorders (QStarz) were time-matched and a validated algorithm assigned four travel modes (walking, cycling, motorised vehicle, train). We examined change in time spent in different travel modes, using multilevel linear regresssion models adjusting for sex, age group, ethnicity, housing group (fixed effects) and household (random effect), comparing those who had moved to East Village at follow-up with those who did not. Results Of 877 adults (69%) followed-up, 578 (66%) provided valid accelerometry and GPS data for at least 1 day (≥540 min) at both time points; half had moved to East Village. Despite no overall effects on physical activity levels, sizeable improvements in walkability and access to public transport in East Village resulted in decreased daily vehicle travel (8.3 mins, 95%CI 2.5,14.0), particularly in the intermediate housing group (9.6 mins, 95%CI 2.2,16.9), and increased underground travel (3.9 mins, 95%CI 1.2,6.5), more so in the market-rent group (11.5 mins, 95%CI 4.4,18.6). However, there were no effects on time spent walking or cycling.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s). 2020 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: 11 Medical and Health Sciences, 13 Education, Public Health
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Population Health Research Institute (INPH)
Journal or Publication Title: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
ISSN: 1479-5868
Dates:
DateEvent
10 February 2020Published
20 January 2020Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
MR/J000345/1National Prevention Research InitiativeUNSPECIFIED
12/211/69National Institute for Health Researchhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000272
204809/Z/16/ZWellcome Trusthttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100004440
MC_UU_12017-10Medical Research Councilhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265
1107672National Health and Medical Research Councilhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000925
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/111600
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-0916-0

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