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Is child weight status correctly reported to parents? Cross-sectional analysis of National Child Measurement Programme data using ethnic-specific BMI adjustments.

Firman, N; Boomla, K; Hudda, MT; Robson, J; Whincup, P; Dezateux, C (2020) Is child weight status correctly reported to parents? Cross-sectional analysis of National Child Measurement Programme data using ethnic-specific BMI adjustments. J Public Health (Oxf). ISSN 1741-3850 https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdz188
SGUL Authors: Whincup, Peter Hynes Hudda, Mohammed Taqui

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: BMI underestimates and overestimates body fat in children from South Asian and Black ethnic groups, respectively. METHODS: We used cross-sectional NCMP data (2015-17) for 38 270 children in three inner-London local authorities: City & Hackney, Newham and Tower Hamlets (41% South Asian, 18.8% Black): 20 439 4-5 year-olds (48.9% girls) and 17 831 10-11 year-olds (49.1% girls). We estimated the proportion of parents who would have received different information about their child's weight status, and the area-level prevalence of obesity-defined as ≥98th centile-had ethnic-specific BMI adjustments been employed in the English National Child Measurement Programme (NCMP). RESULTS: Had ethnic-specific adjustment been employed, 19.7% (3112/15 830) of parents of children from South Asian backgrounds would have been informed that their child was in a heavier weight category, and 19.1% (1381/7217) of parents of children from Black backgrounds would have been informed that their child was in a lighter weight category. Ethnic-specific adjustment increased obesity prevalence from 7.9% (95% CI: 7.6, 8.3) to 9.1% (8.7, 9.5) amongst 4-5 year-olds and from 17.5% (16.9, 18.1) to 18.8% (18.2, 19.4) amongst 10-11 year-olds. CONCLUSIONS: Ethnic-specific adjustment in the NCMP would ensure equitable categorization of weight status, provide correct information to parents and support local service provision for families.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com
Keywords: children, ethnicity, obesity, Public Health, 1117 Public Health and Health Services
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Population Health Research Institute (INPH)
Journal or Publication Title: J Public Health (Oxf)
ISSN: 1741-3850
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
17 January 2020Published Online
21 August 2019Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
MGU0419Barts CharityUNSPECIFIED
GPPB1C2Health Data Research UKUNSPECIFIED
PG/15/19/31336British Heart Foundationhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000274
FS/17/76/33286British Heart Foundationhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000274
PubMed ID: 31950165
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/111580
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdz188

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