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Growth to early adulthood following extremely preterm birth: the EPICure study.

Ni, Y; Beckmann, J; Gandhi, R; Hurst, JR; Morris, JK; Marlow, N (2020) Growth to early adulthood following extremely preterm birth: the EPICure study. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. ISSN 1468-2052 https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2019-318192
SGUL Authors: Morris, Joan Katherine

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate growth trajectories from age 2.5 to 19 years in individuals born before 26 weeks of gestation (extremely preterm; EP) compared with term-born controls. METHODS: Multilevel modelling of growth data from the EPICure study, a prospective 1995 birth cohort of 315 EP participants born in the UK and Ireland and 160 term-born controls recruited at school age. Height, weight, head circumference and body mass index (BMI) z-scores were derived from UK standards at ages 2.5, 6, 11 and 19 years. RESULTS: 129 (42%) EP children were assessed at 19 years. EP individuals were on average 4.0 cm shorter and 6.8 kg lighter with a 1.5 cm smaller head circumference relative to controls at 19 years. Relative to controls, EP participants grew faster in weight by 0.06 SD per year (95% CI 0.05 to 0.07), in head circumference by 0.04 SD (95% CI 0.03 to 0.05), but with no catch-up in height. For the EP group, because of weight catch-up between 6 and 19 years, BMI was significantly elevated at 19 years to +0.32 SD; 23.4% had BMI >25 kg/m2 and 6.3% >30 kg/m2 but these proportions were similar to those in control subjects. EP and control participants showed similar pubertal development in early adolescence, which was not associated with height at 19 years in either study group. Growth through childhood was related to birth characteristics and to neonatal feeding practices. CONCLUSIONS: EP participants remained shorter and lighter and had smaller head circumferences than reference data or controls in adulthood but had elevated BMI.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This article has been accepted for publication in ADC Fetal & Neonatal edition, 2020 following peer review, and the Version of Record can be accessed online at http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2019-318192. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020.
Keywords: cohort studies, extremely preterm, growth trajectories, cohort studies, extremely preterm, growth trajectories, Pediatrics, 1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Population Health Research Institute (INPH)
Journal or Publication Title: Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed
ISSN: 1468-2052
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
6 January 2020Published Online
10 December 2019Accepted
Publisher License: Publisher's own licence
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
MR/J01107X/1Medical Research Councilhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265
PubMed ID: 31907276
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/111558
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2019-318192

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