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External Compressive Bracing with Initial Reduction of Pectus Carinatum: Compliance is the Key.

Fraser, S; Harling, L; Patel, A; Richards, T; Hunt, I (2020) External Compressive Bracing with Initial Reduction of Pectus Carinatum: Compliance is the Key. Ann Thorac Surg, 109 (2). pp. 413-419. ISSN 1552-6259 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2019.08.026
SGUL Authors: Hunt, Ian

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: To assess the impact of manipulation and a tailored programme for compressive bracing on the quality of life of patients with flexible pectus carinatum METHODS: 249 sequential patients attending clinic for assessment of pectus carinatum deformities underwent out-patient manipulation and then followed a prescribed schedule of continuous external compressive bracing but without significant progressive tightening. RESULTS: There was successful sustained reduction of the deformity in 244 patients with high reported rates of concordance (98%) and satisfaction (94%). Patients experienced a reduction in symptoms of anxiety and depression (p<0.0001) and had improved body satisfaction (p<0.0001). Mild skin irritation occurred in 18% of patients (n=44) and there were two severe cases of skin irritation, one of which resulted in abandonment of bracing. CONCLUSIONS: Manipulation and non-tightening compressive bracing was associated with complete concordance, high levels of successful bracing, improved confidence and reduced psychological morbidity.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2019. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Keywords: ‘bracing’, ‘chest wall’, ‘pectus carinatum’, 1103 Clinical Sciences, 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology, Respiratory System
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: Ann Thorac Surg
ISSN: 1552-6259
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
February 2020Published
23 September 2019Published Online
8 August 2019Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
PubMed ID: 31557482
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/111441
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2019.08.026

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