SORA

Advancing, promoting and sharing knowledge of health through excellence in teaching, clinical practice and research into the prevention and treatment of illness

All-cause pneumonia in children after the introduction of pneumococcal vaccines in the United Kingdom: a population-based study

Lau, WCY; Bielicki, J; Tersigni, C; Saxena, S; Wong, ICK; Sharland, M; Hsia, Y (2019) All-cause pneumonia in children after the introduction of pneumococcal vaccines in the United Kingdom: a population-based study. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety. ISSN 1053-8569 (In Press)
SGUL Authors: Hsia, Yingfen

[img] Microsoft Word (.docx) Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only until 28 February 2020.
Available under License ["licenses_description_publisher" not defined].

Download (418kB)

Abstract

Purpose: To explore the impact of PCVs in preventing childhood pneumonia in the United Kingdom. Methods: We carried out a population-based study to assess the trend of all-cause pneumonia in children aged <10 years between 2002 and 2012. Data were obtained from the IMS Disease Analyzer, a primary care database in UK. Three time-periods were defined to estimate monthly incidence: pre-PCV7 (January 2002–August 2006), post-PCV7 (September 2006–March 2010), and post-PCV13 (April 2010–December 2012). Interrupted time series analysis (ITS) was performed to assess any immediate change or gradual change in the monthly incidence of pneumonia between pre- and post-vaccination introduction. Results: A total of 4,228 children with at least one all-cause pneumonia episode were identified. The overall annual incidence rate of all-cause pneumonia declined by 37% from 3.8 episodes/1,000 person-years in 2002 to 2.4 episodes/1,000 person-years in 2012. Results of ITS analyses indicated that the incidence did not decline immediately after the introduction of PCV7 and PCV13. The incidence declined gradually in children aged <2 years (IRR=0.98; 95%CI=0.97-0.99) post-PCV7, and levelled off during post-PCV13 (IRR=1.00; 95%CI=0.99-1.02). No significant changes in incidence trend was observed in children aged 2-4 years (IRR=0.86; 95%CI=0.68-1.07) and 5-9 years (IRR=0.92; 95%CI=0.73-1.15) after PCV13 introduction. Conclusions: In the UK, the incidence of all-cause pneumonia in children <2 years declined after the introduction of PCV7 and levelled off in the first two years of introduction of PCV13. Continual monitoring is warranted to assess the population impact of PCV13 in preventing childhood pneumonia in the long-term.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: 1115 Pharmacology And Pharmaceutical Sciences, 1117 Public Health And Health Services, Pharmacology & Pharmacy
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety
ISSN: 1053-8569
Dates:
DateEvent
13 February 2019Accepted
Publisher License: Publisher's own licence
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
UNSPECIFIEDPfizerUNSPECIFIED
NIHR CDF-2011-04-048National Institute for Health Researchhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000272
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/110657

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item