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A systematic review of behaviour change techniques within interventions to prevent return to smoking postpartum.

Brown, T; Hardeman, W; Bauld, L; Holland, R; Maskrey, V; Naughton, F; Orton, S; Ussher, MH; Notley, C (2019) A systematic review of behaviour change techniques within interventions to prevent return to smoking postpartum. Elsevier, 92. pp. 236-243. ISSN 0306-4603 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.12.031
SGUL Authors: Ussher, Michael Henry

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Abstract

Introduction There is no routine support to prevent postpartum smoking relapse, due to lack of effective interventions. Previous reviews have identified behaviour change techniques (BCTs) within pregnancy cessation trials to specify which components might be incorporated into more effective interventions, but no reviews have identified BCTs for prevention of smoking relapse postpartum. We reviewed BCTs and potential delivery modes, to inform future interventions. Methods We searched Medline and EMBASE from January 2015–May 2017; and identified trials published before 2015 by handsearching systematic reviews. We included RCTs where: i) ≥1 intervention component aimed to maintain smoking abstinence versus a less intensive intervention; ii) participants included pregnant or postpartum smoking quitters; iii) smoking status was reported in the postpartum period. We extracted trial characteristics and used the Behaviour Change Technique Taxonomy v1 to extract BCTs. We aimed to identify ‘promising’ BCTs i.e. those frequently occurring and present in ≥2 trials that demonstrated long-term effectiveness (≥6 months postpartum). Data synthesis was narrative. Results We included 32 trials, six of which demonstrated long-term effectiveness. These six trials used self-help, mainly in conjunction with counselling, and were largely delivered remotely. We identified six BCTs as promising: ‘problem solving’, ‘information about health consequences’, ‘information about social and environmental consequences’, ‘social support’, ‘reduce negative emotions’ and ‘instruction on how to perform a behaviour’. Conclusions Future interventions to prevent postpartum smoking relapse might include these six BCTs to maximise effectiveness. Tailored self-help approaches, with/without counselling, may be favourable modes of delivery of BCTs.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/BY/4.0/).
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Population Health Research Institute (INPH)
Journal or Publication Title: Elsevier
ISSN: 0306-4603
Dates:
DateEvent
May 2019Published
23 December 2018Published Online
22 December 2018Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
MR/P016944/1Medical Research Councilhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/110498
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.12.031

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