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The Moral of the Tale: Stories, Trust, and Public Engagement with Clinical Ethics via Radio and Theatre.

Bowman, D (2017) The Moral of the Tale: Stories, Trust, and Public Engagement with Clinical Ethics via Radio and Theatre. J Bioeth Inq, 14 (1). pp. 43-52. ISSN 1176-7529 https://doi.org/10.1007/s11673-016-9766-5
SGUL Authors: Bowman, Deborah Faye

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Abstract

Trust is frequently discussed with reference to the professional-patient relationship. However, trust is less explored in relation to the ways in which understanding of, and responses to, questions of ethics are discussed by both the "public" and "experts." Public engagement activity in healthcare ethics may invoke "trust" in analysing a moral question or problem but less frequently conceives of trust as integral to "public engagement" itself. This paper explores the relationship between trust and the ways in which questions of healthcare ethics are identified and negotiated by both "experts" and the public. Drawing on two examples from the author's "public engagement" work-a radio programme for the British Broadcasting Corporation and work with a playwright and theatre-the paper interrogates the ways in which "public engagement" is often characterized. The author argues that the common approach to public engagement in questions of ethics is unhelpfully constrained by a systemic disposition which continues to privilege the professional or expert voice at the expense of meaningful exchange and dialogue. By creating space for novel interactions between the "expert" and the "public," authentic engagement is achieved that enables not only the participants to flourish but also contributes to trust itself.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s) 2016. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.
Keywords: Clinical ethics, Ethics and the media, Ethics and theatre, Narrative, Public engagement, Trust, Bioethics, Codes of Ethics, Community Participation, Delivery of Health Care, Humans, Morals, Physician's Role, Professional Practice, Professional-Patient Relations, Public Opinion, Radio, Social Perception, Social Responsibility, Trust, Humans, Physician's Role, Professional-Patient Relations, Trust, Morals, Social Perception, Public Opinion, Radio, Bioethics, Codes of Ethics, Social Responsibility, Professional Practice, Delivery of Health Care, Community Participation, Clinical ethics, Ethics and the media, Ethics and theatre, Narrative, Public engagement, Trust, Bioethics, Codes of Ethics, Community Participation, Delivery of Health Care, Humans, Morals, Physician's Role, Professional Practice, Professional-Patient Relations, Public Opinion, Radio, Social Perception, Social Responsibility, Trust, 1801 Law, 2201 Applied Ethics, Applied Ethics
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Institute of Medical & Biomedical Education (IMBE)
Journal or Publication Title: J Bioeth Inq
ISSN: 1176-7529
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
March 2017Published
23 November 2016Accepted
6 January 2017Published Online
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
PubMed ID: 28063105
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/110391
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11673-016-9766-5

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