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Clinical review: Update on hemodynamic monitoring--a consensus of 16.

Vincent, J-L; Rhodes, A; Perel, A; Martin, GS; Della Rocca, G; Vallet, B; Pinsky, MR; Hofer, CK; Teboul, J-L; de Boode, W-P; et al. Vincent, J-L; Rhodes, A; Perel, A; Martin, GS; Della Rocca, G; Vallet, B; Pinsky, MR; Hofer, CK; Teboul, J-L; de Boode, W-P; Scolletta, S; Vieillard-Baron, A; De Backer, D; Walley, KR; Maggiorini, M; Singer, M (2011) Clinical review: Update on hemodynamic monitoring--a consensus of 16. Crit Care, 15 (4). p. 229. ISSN 1466-609X https://doi.org/10.1186/cc10291
SGUL Authors: Rhodes, Andrew

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Abstract

Hemodynamic monitoring plays a fundamental role in the management of acutely ill patients. With increased concerns about the use of invasive techniques, notably the pulmonary artery catheter, to measure cardiac output, recent years have seen an influx of new, less-invasive means of measuring hemodynamic variables, leaving the clinician somewhat bewildered as to which technique, if any, is best and which he/she should use. In this consensus paper, we try to provide some clarification, offering an objective review of the available monitoring systems, including their specific advantages and limitations, and highlighting some key principles underlying hemodynamic monitoring in critically ill patients.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © BioMed Central Ltd 2011 This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Consensus, Critical Illness, Hemodynamics, Humans, Monitoring, Physiologic, Humans, Critical Illness, Monitoring, Physiologic, Consensus, Hemodynamics, 11 Medical And Health Sciences, Emergency & Critical Care Medicine
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute (MCS)
Academic Structure > Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute (MCS) > Cell Sciences (INCCCS)
Journal or Publication Title: Crit Care
ISSN: 1466-609X
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
18 August 2011Published
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
PubMed ID: 21884645
Web of Science ID: WOS:000298082800063
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/110387
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1186/cc10291

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