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Subthalamic nucleus gamma activity increases not only during movement but also during movement inhibition.

Fischer, P; Pogosyan, A; Herz, DM; Cheeran, B; Green, AL; Fitzgerald, J; Aziz, TZ; Hyam, J; Little, S; Foltynie, T; et al. Fischer, P; Pogosyan, A; Herz, DM; Cheeran, B; Green, AL; Fitzgerald, J; Aziz, TZ; Hyam, J; Little, S; Foltynie, T; Limousin, P; Zrinzo, L; Brown, P; Tan, H (2017) Subthalamic nucleus gamma activity increases not only during movement but also during movement inhibition. Elife, 6. e23947. ISSN 2050-084X https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23947
SGUL Authors: Cheeran, Binith

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Abstract

Gamma activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is widely viewed as a pro-kinetic rhythm. Here we test the hypothesis that rather than being specifically linked to movement execution, gamma activity reflects dynamic processing in this nucleus. We investigated the role of gamma during fast stopping and recorded scalp electroencephalogram and local field potentials from deep brain stimulation electrodes in 9 Parkinson's disease patients. Patients interrupted finger tapping (paced by a metronome) in response to a stop-signal sound, which was timed such that successful stopping would occur only in ~50% of all trials. STN gamma (60-90 Hz) increased most strongly when the tap was successfully stopped, whereas phase-based connectivity between the contralateral STN and motor cortex decreased. Beta or theta power seemed less directly related to stopping. In summary, STN gamma activity may support flexible motor control as it did not only increase during movement execution but also during rapid action-stopping.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2017, Fischer et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited.
Keywords: Parkinson's disease, basal ganglia, finger tapping, human, motor inhibition, neuroscience, stop signal, stopping
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute (MCS)
Journal or Publication Title: Elife
ISSN: 2050-084X
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
25 July 2017Published
27 June 2017Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
MC_UU_12024/1Medical Research Councilhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265
MSCA 655605Horizon 2020UNSPECIFIED
105804/Z/14/ZWellcome Trusthttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100004440
UNSPECIFIEDParkinson Appeal UKUNSPECIFIED
UNSPECIFIEDMonument TrustUNSPECIFIED
PubMed ID: 28742498
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/109483
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23947

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