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Takeaway meal consumption and risk markers for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity in children aged 9-10 years: a cross-sectional study.

Donin, AS; Nightingale, CM; Owen, CG; Rudnicka, AR; Cook, DG; Whincup, PH (2017) Takeaway meal consumption and risk markers for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity in children aged 9-10 years: a cross-sectional study. Arch Dis Child, 103 (5). pp. 431-436. ISSN 1468-2044 https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2017-312981
SGUL Authors: Nightingale, Claire

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between takeaway meal consumption and risk markers for coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity risk markers in children. DESIGN: A cross-sectional, school-based observational study. SETTING: 85 primary schools across London, Birmingham and Leicester. PARTICIPANTS: 1948 UK primary school children in year 5, aged 9-10 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Children reported their frequency of takeaway meal consumption, completed a 24-hour dietary recall, had physical measurements and provided a fasting blood sample. RESULTS: Among 1948 participants with complete data, 499 (26%) never/hardly ever consumed a takeaway meal, 894 (46%) did so <1/week and 555 (28%) did ≥1/week. In models adjusted for age, sex, month, school, ethnicity and socioeconomic status, more frequent takeaway meal consumption was associated with higher dietary intakes of energy, fat % energy and saturated fat % energy and higher energy density (all P trend <0.001) and lower starch, protein and micronutrient intakes (all P trend <0.05). A higher frequency of takeaway meal consumption was associated with higher serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (P trend=0.04, 0.01, respectively); children eating a takeaway meal ≥1/week had total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol 0.09 mmol/L (95% CI 0.01 to 0.18) and 0.10 mmol/L (95% CI 0.02 to 0.18) higher respectively than children never/hardly ever eating a takeaway meal; their fat mass index was also higher. CONCLUSIONS: More frequent takeaway meal consumption in children was associated with unhealthy dietary nutrient intake patterns and potentially with adverse longer term consequences for obesity and coronary heart disease risk.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted. This is an Open Access article distributed in accordance with the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt and build upon this work, for commercial use, provided the original work is properly cited. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: cholesterol, coronary heart disease, diet, nutrition, takeaway meals, Pediatrics, 1103 Clinical Sciences, 1114 Paediatrics And Reproductive Medicine, 1117 Public Health And Health Services
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Population Health Research Institute (INPH)
Journal or Publication Title: Arch Dis Child
ISSN: 1468-2044
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
3 December 2017Published Online
18 November 2017Published
23 October 2017Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
BDA 11/0004317Diabetes UKhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000361
068362/Z/02/ZWellcome Trusthttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100004440
G0501295Medical Research Councilhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000265
UNSPECIFIEDBritish Heart Foundationhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000274
UNSPECIFIEDCancer Research UKhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000289
UNSPECIFIEDEconomic and Social Research Councilhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100000269
PubMed ID: 29199181
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/109393
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2017-312981

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