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Maternal Disease With Group B Streptococcus and Serotype Distribution Worldwide: Systematic Review and Meta-analyses.

Hall, J; Adams, NH; Bartlett, L; Seale, AC; Lamagni, T; Bianchi-Jassir, F; Lawn, JE; Baker, CJ; Cutland, C; Heath, PT; et al. Hall, J; Adams, NH; Bartlett, L; Seale, AC; Lamagni, T; Bianchi-Jassir, F; Lawn, JE; Baker, CJ; Cutland, C; Heath, PT; Ip, M; Le Doare, K; Madhi, SA; Rubens, CE; Saha, SK; Schrag, S; Sobanjo-Ter Meulen, A; Vekemans, J; Gravett, MG (2017) Maternal Disease With Group B Streptococcus and Serotype Distribution Worldwide: Systematic Review and Meta-analyses. Clin Infect Dis, 65 (suppl_2). S112-S124. ISSN 1537-6591 https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix660
SGUL Authors: Heath, Paul Trafford

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Abstract

Background: Infections such as group B Streptococcus (GBS) are an important cause of maternal sepsis, yet limited data on epidemiology exist. This article, the third of 11, estimates the incidence of maternal GBS disease worldwide. Methods: We conducted systematic literature reviews (PubMed/Medline, Embase, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS], World Health Organization Library Information System [WHOLIS], and Scopus) and sought unpublished data on invasive GBS disease in women pregnant or within 42 days postpartum. We undertook meta-analyses to derive pooled estimates of the incidence of maternal GBS disease. We examined maternal and perinatal outcomes and GBS serotypes. Results: Fifteen studies and 1 unpublished dataset were identified, all from United Nations-defined developed regions. From a single study with pregnancies as the denominator, the incidence of maternal GBS disease was 0.38 (95% confidence interval [CI], .28-.48) per 1000 pregnancies. From 3 studies reporting cases by the number of maternities (pregnancies resulting in live/still birth), the incidence was 0.23 (95% CI, .09-.37). Five studies reported serotypes, with Ia being the most common (31%). Most maternal GBS disease was detected at or after delivery. Conclusions: Incidence data on maternal GBS disease in developing regions are lacking. In developed regions the incidence is low, as are the sequelae for the mother, but the risk to the fetus and newborn is substantial. The timing of GBS disease suggests that a maternal vaccine given in the late second or early third trimester of pregnancy would prevent most maternal cases.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: group B Streptococcus, incidence, postpartum, pregnancy, serotype, group B Streptococcus, pregnancy, postpartum, incidence, serotype, Microbiology, 06 Biological Sciences, 11 Medical And Health Sciences
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: Clin Infect Dis
ISSN: 1537-6591
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
15 November 2017Published
6 November 2017Published Online
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
OPP1131158Bill and Melinda Gates Foundationhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000865
PubMed ID: 29117328
Web of Science ID: WOS:000414511400003
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/109349
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix660

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