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Group B Streptococcal Disease Worldwide for Pregnant Women, Stillbirths, and Children: Why, What, and How to Undertake Estimates?

Lawn, JE; Bianchi-Jassir, F; Russell, NJ; Kohli-Lynch, M; Tann, CJ; Hall, J; Madrid, L; Baker, CJ; Bartlett, L; Cutland, C; et al. Lawn, JE; Bianchi-Jassir, F; Russell, NJ; Kohli-Lynch, M; Tann, CJ; Hall, J; Madrid, L; Baker, CJ; Bartlett, L; Cutland, C; Gravett, MG; Heath, PT; Ip, M; Le Doare, K; Madhi, SA; Rubens, CE; Saha, SK; Schrag, S; Sobanjo-Ter Meulen, A; Vekemans, J; Seale, AC (2017) Group B Streptococcal Disease Worldwide for Pregnant Women, Stillbirths, and Children: Why, What, and How to Undertake Estimates? Clin Infect Dis, 65 (suppl_2). S89-S99. ISSN 1537-6591 https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix653
SGUL Authors: Heath, Paul Trafford

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Abstract

Improving maternal, newborn, and child health is central to Sustainable Development Goal targets for 2030, requiring acceleration especially to prevent 5.6 million deaths around the time of birth. Infections contribute to this burden, but etiological data are limited. Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is an important perinatal pathogen, although previously focus has been primarily on liveborn children, especially early-onset disease. In this first of an 11-article supplement, we discuss the following: (1) Why estimate the worldwide burden of GBS disease? (2) What outcomes of GBS in pregnancy should be included? (3) What data and epidemiological parameters are required? (4) What methods and models can be used to transparently estimate this burden of GBS? (5) What are the challenges with available data? and (6) How can estimates address data gaps to better inform GBS interventions including maternal immunization? We review all available GBS data worldwide, including maternal GBS colonization, risk of neonatal disease (with/without intrapartum antibiotic prophylaxis), maternal GBS disease, neonatal/infant GBS disease, and subsequent impairment, plus GBS-associated stillbirth, preterm birth, and neonatal encephalopathy. We summarize our methods for searches, meta-analyses, and modeling including a compartmental model. Our approach is consistent with the World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for Accurate and Transparent Health Estimates Reporting (GATHER), published in The Lancet and the Public Library of Science (PLoS). We aim to address priority epidemiological gaps highlighted by WHO to inform potential maternal vaccination.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: global burden, group B Streptococcus, maternal, neonatal, stillbirth, group B Streptococcus, global burden, stillbirth, neonatal, maternal, Microbiology, 06 Biological Sciences, 11 Medical And Health Sciences
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: Clin Infect Dis
ISSN: 1537-6591
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
15 November 2017Published
6 November 2017Published Online
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
OPP1131158Bill and Melinda Gates Foundationhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000865
PubMed ID: 29117323
Web of Science ID: WOS:000414511400001
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/109348
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1093/cid/cix653

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