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Point Prevalence Surveys of Antimicrobial Use among Hospitalized Children in Six Hospitals in India in 2016.

Gandra, S; Singh, SK; Jinka, DR; Kanithi, R; Chikkappa, AK; Sharma, A; Dharmapalan, D; Vasudevan, AK; Tunga, O; Akula, A; et al. Gandra, S; Singh, SK; Jinka, DR; Kanithi, R; Chikkappa, AK; Sharma, A; Dharmapalan, D; Vasudevan, AK; Tunga, O; Akula, A; Garg, G; Hsia, Y; Murki, S; Alvarez-Uria, G; Sharland, M; Laxminarayan, R (2017) Point Prevalence Surveys of Antimicrobial Use among Hospitalized Children in Six Hospitals in India in 2016. Antibiotics (Basel), 6 (3). p. 19. ISSN 2079-6382 https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics6030019
SGUL Authors: Sharland, Michael Roy Hsia, Yingfen

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Abstract

The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in India is among the highest in the world. Antimicrobial use in inpatient settings is an important driver of resistance, but is poorly characterized, particularly in hospitalized children. In this study, conducted as part of the Global Antimicrobial Resistance, Prescribing, and Efficacy in Neonates and Children (GARPEC) project, we examined the prevalence of and indications of antimicrobial use, as well as antimicrobial agents used among hospitalized children by conducting four point prevalence surveys in six hospitals between February 2016 and February 2017. A total of 681 children were hospitalized in six hospitals across all survey days, and 419 (61.5%) were prescribed one or more antimicrobials (antibacterials, antivirals, antifungals). Antibacterial agents accounted for 90.8% (547/602) of the total antimicrobial prescriptions, of which third-generation cephalosporins (3GCs) accounted for 38.9% (213/547) and penicillin plus enzyme inhibitor combinations accounted for 14.4% (79/547). Lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) was the most common indication for prescribing antimicrobials (149 prescriptions; 24.8%). Although national guidelines recommend the use of penicillin and combinations as first-line agents for LRTI, 3GCs were the most commonly prescribed antibacterial agents (55/149 LRTI prescriptions; 36.9%). In conclusion, 61.5% of hospitalized children were on at least one antimicrobial agent, with excessive use of 3GCs. Hence there is an opportunity to limit their inappropriate use.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: India, antimicrobial use, children, hospital, point prevalence survey
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: Antibiotics (Basel)
ISSN: 2079-6382
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
13 September 2017Published
7 September 2017Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
UNSPECIFIEDBill and Melinda Gates Foundationhttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000865
PubMed ID: 28902135
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/109107
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.3390/antibiotics6030019

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