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Naltrexone inhibits IL-6 and TNFa production in human immune cell subsets following stimulation with ligands for intracellular Toll-like receptors

Cant, R; Dalgleish, AG; Allen, RL (2017) Naltrexone inhibits IL-6 and TNFa production in human immune cell subsets following stimulation with ligands for intracellular Toll-like receptors. Frontiers in Immunology, 8. p. 809. ISSN 1664-3224 https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.00809
SGUL Authors: Allen, Rachel Louise

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Abstract

The opioid antagonist naltrexone hydrochloride has been suggested to be a potential therapy at low dosage for multiple inflammatory conditions and cancers. Little is known about the immune-modulating effects of naltrexone, but an effect on the activity of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported. We analyzed the effects of naltrexone hydrochloride on IL-6 secretion by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in vitro following stimulation with ligands for TLR4 and for the intracellular receptors TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9. Naltrexone did not affect cell viability or induce apoptosis of PBMC. Intracellular staining demonstrated that naltrexone inhibited production of IL-6 and TNFα by monocyte and plasmacytoid dendritic cell subsets within the PBMC population following treatment with ligands for TLR7/8 and TLR9, respectively. No effect of cytokine production by PBMC following stimulation of TLR4 was observed. Additionally, naltrexone inhibited IL-6 production in isolated monocytes and B cells after TLR7/8 and TLR9 stimulation, respectively, but no effect on IL-6 production in isolated monocytes after TLR4 stimulation was observed. These findings indicate that naltrexone has the potential to modulate the secretion of inflammatory cytokines in response to intracellular TLR activity, supporting the hypothesis that it may have potential for use as an immunomodulator.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2017 Cant, Dalgleish and Allen. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: Frontiers in Immunology
ISSN: 1664-3224
Dates:
DateEvent
11 July 2017Published
26 June 2017Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
UNSPECIFIEDInstitute for Cancer Vaccines and ImmunotherapyUNSPECIFIED
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/108924
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.00809

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