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AIDS-Related Mycoses: Current Progress in the Field and Future Priorities.

Armstrong-James, D; Bicanic, T; Brown, GD; Hoving, JC; Meintjes, G; Nielsen, K; Working Group from the EMBO Workshop on AIDS-Related Mycoses, (2017) AIDS-Related Mycoses: Current Progress in the Field and Future Priorities. Trends Microbiol, 25 (6). pp. 428-430. ISSN 1878-4380 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tim.2017.02.013
SGUL Authors: Bicanic, Tihana

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Abstract

Opportunistic fungal infections continue to take an unacceptably heavy toll on the most disadvantaged living with HIV-AIDS, and are a major driver for HIV-related deaths. At the second EMBO Workshop on AIDS-Related Mycoses, clinicians and scientists from around the world reported current progress and key priorities for improving outcomes from HIV-related mycoses.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
Keywords: AIDS, HIV, fungal infection, immunity, mortality, translational research, Microbiology, 0605 Microbiology, 1108 Medical Microbiology
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: Trends Microbiol
ISSN: 1878-4380
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
June 2017Published
25 April 2017Published Online
24 February 2017Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
PubMed ID: 28454846
Web of Science ID: WOS:000401231800002
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/108915
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tim.2017.02.013

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