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Impaired renal function affects clinical outcomes and management of patients with heart failure.

Jenkins, R; Mandarano, L; Gugathas, S; Kaski, JC; Anderson, L; Banerjee, D (2017) Impaired renal function affects clinical outcomes and management of patients with heart failure. ESC Heart Fail, 4 (4). pp. 576-584. ISSN 2055-5822 https://doi.org/10.1002/ehf2.12185
SGUL Authors: Kaski, Juan Carlos Banerjee, Debasish

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Abstract

AIMS: Inpatients with heart failure and renal impairment have poor outcomes and variable quality of care. We investigate treatment practice and outcomes in an unselected real-world cohort using historical creatinine measurements. METHODS AND RESULTS: Admissions between 1/4/2013 and 30/4/2015 diagnosed at discharge with heart failure were retrospectively analysed. Stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and acute kidney injury (AKI) were calculated from creatinine at discharge and 3-12 months before admission. We identified 1056 admissions of 851 patients (mean age 76 years, 56% Caucasian, 36% with diabetes mellitus, 54% with ischaemic heart disease, and 57% with valvular heart disease). CKD was common; 36%-Stage 3a/b, 11%-Stage 4/5; patients were older, more often diabetic, with higher potassium, lower haemoglobin, and more oedema but similar prevalence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) compared patients with Stages 0-2. AKI was present in 17.0% (10.4%-Stage 1, 3.7%-Stage 2, and 2.9%-Stage 3); these had higher potassium and lower haemoglobin than patients with no AKI. Length of stay was longer in Stage 4/5 CKD [11 days; P = 0.008] and AKI [13 days; P = 0.006]. Mortality was higher with Stage 4/5 CKD (13.8% compared with 7.7% for Stages 0-2 CKD (P = 0.036)] and increased with AKI (5%-no AKI, 20.9%-Stage 1, 35.9%-Stage 2, and 48.4%-Stage 3; P < 0.001). Adjusted for age, diabetes, and LVSD, both AKI and Stage 4/5 CKD were independent predictors of in-hospital mortality. In survivors with LVSD, the discharge prescription of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blockers decreased with progressive CKD, [84%-no-mild, 59%-moderate, and 36%-severe CKD; P < 0.001]; this was not purely explained by hyperkalaemia. CONCLUSIONS: Inpatients with heart failure and renal impairment, acute and chronic, failed to receive recommended therapy and had poor outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made.
Keywords: Epidemiology, Heart failure, Kidney, Mortality
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute (MCS)
Academic Structure > Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute (MCS) > Cardiac (INCCCA)
Journal or Publication Title: ESC Heart Fail
ISSN: 2055-5822
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
20 November 2017Published
5 September 2017Published Online
4 May 2017Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0
PubMed ID: 28872780
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/108837
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1002/ehf2.12185

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