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Association between functional antibody against Group B Streptococcus and maternal and infant colonization in a Gambian cohort.

Le Doare, K; Faal, A; Jaiteh, M; Sarfo, F; Taylor, S; Warburton, F; Humphries, H; Birt, J; Jarju, S; Darboe, S; et al. Le Doare, K; Faal, A; Jaiteh, M; Sarfo, F; Taylor, S; Warburton, F; Humphries, H; Birt, J; Jarju, S; Darboe, S; Clarke, E; Antonio, M; Foster-Nyarko, E; Heath, PT; Gorringe, A; Kampmann, B (2017) Association between functional antibody against Group B Streptococcus and maternal and infant colonization in a Gambian cohort. Vaccine, 35 (22). pp. 2970-2978. ISSN 1873-2518 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.04.013
SGUL Authors: Heath, Paul Trafford

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Vertical transmission of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a prerequisite for early-onset disease and a consequence of maternal GBS colonization. Disease protection is associated with maternally-derived anti-GBS antibody. Using a novel antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition flow cytometry assay which correlates with opsonic killing we developed a model to assess the impact of maternally-derived functional anti-GBS antibody on infant GBS colonization from birth to day 60-89 of life. METHODS: Rectovaginal swabs and cord blood (birth) and infant nasopharyngeal/rectal swabs (birth, day 6 and day 60-89) were obtained from 750 mother/infant pairs. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition with cord and infant sera was measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: We established that as maternally-derived anti-GBS functional antibody increases, infant colonization decreases at birth and up to three months of life, the critical time window for the development of GBS disease. Further, we observed a serotype (ST)-dependent threshold above which no infant was colonized at birth. Functional antibody above the upper 95th confidence interval for the geometric mean concentration was associated with absence of infant GBS colonization at birth for STII (p<0.001), STIII (p=0.01) and STV (p<0.001). Increased functional antibody was also associated with clearance of GBS between birth and day 60-89. CONCLUSIONS: Higher concentrations of maternally-derived antibody-mediated complement deposition are associated with a decreased risk of GBS colonization in infants up to day 60-89 of life. Our findings are of relevance to establish thresholds for protection following vaccination of pregnant women with future GBS vaccines.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Keywords: Group B Streptococcus, Meningitis, Neonatal, Vaccines, Virology, 06 Biological Sciences, 07 Agricultural And Veterinary Sciences, 11 Medical And Health Sciences
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: Vaccine
ISSN: 1873-2518
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
19 May 2017Published
24 April 2017Published Online
5 April 2017Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
WT2015Wellcome Trusthttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100004440
PubMed ID: 28449969
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/108832
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.04.013

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