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Spatial clustering of high load ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection in trachoma: A cross-sectional population-based study

Last, A; Burr, S; Alexander, N; Harding-Esch, EM; Roberts, C; Nabicassa, M; Teixeira da Silva Cassama, E; Mabey, D; Holland, M; Bailey, R (2017) Spatial clustering of high load ocular Chlamydia trachomatis infection in trachoma: A cross-sectional population-based study. Pathog Dis., 75 (5). ISSN 2049-632X https://doi.org/10.1093/femspd/ftx050
SGUL Authors: Harding-Esch, Emma Michele

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Abstract

Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) is the most common cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infection and infectious cause of blindness (trachoma) worldwide. Understanding the spatial distribution of Ct infection may enable us to identify populations at risk and improve our understanding of Ct transmission. In this study, we sought to investigate the spatial distribution of Ct infection and the clinical features associated with high Ct load in trachoma-endemic communities on the Bijagós Archipelago (Guinea Bissau). We collected 1507 conjunctival samples and corresponding detailed clinical data during a cross-sectional population-based geospatially representative trachoma survey. We used droplet digital PCR to estimate Ct load on conjunctival swabs. Geostatistical tools were used to investigate clustering of ocular Ct infections. Spatial clusters (independent of age and gender) of individuals with high Ct loads were identified using local indicators of spatial association. We did not detect clustering of individuals with low load infections. These data suggest that infections with high bacterial load may be important in Ct transmission. These geospatial tools may be useful in the study of ocular Ct transmission dynamics and as part of trachoma surveillance post-treatment, to identify clusters of infection and thresholds of Ct load that may be important foci of re-emergent infection in communities.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © FEMS 2017. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted reuse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: Pathog Dis.
ISSN: 2049-632X
Dates:
DateEvent
July 2017Published
3 May 2017Published Online
23 March 2017Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
097330/Z/11/ZWellcome Trusthttp://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100004440
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/108831
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1093/femspd/ftx050

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