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Translational models for vascular cognitive impairment: a review including larger species.

Hainsworth, AH; Allan, SM; Boltze, J; Cunningham, C; Farris, C; Head, E; Ihara, M; Isaacs, JD; Kalaria, RN; Lesnik Oberstein, SAMJ; et al. Hainsworth, AH; Allan, SM; Boltze, J; Cunningham, C; Farris, C; Head, E; Ihara, M; Isaacs, JD; Kalaria, RN; Lesnik Oberstein, SAMJ; Moss, MB; Nitzsche, B; Rosenberg, GA; Rutten, JW; Salkovic-Petrisic, M; Troen, AM (2017) Translational models for vascular cognitive impairment: a review including larger species. BMC Med, 15 (1). p. 16. ISSN 1741-7015 https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-017-0793-9
SGUL Authors: Hainsworth, Atticus Henry

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Disease models are useful for prospective studies of pathology, identification of molecular and cellular mechanisms, pre-clinical testing of interventions, and validation of clinical biomarkers. Here, we review animal models relevant to vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). A synopsis of each model was initially presented by expert practitioners. Synopses were refined by the authors, and subsequently by the scientific committee of a recent conference (International Conference on Vascular Dementia 2015). Only peer-reviewed sources were cited. METHODS: We included models that mimic VCI-related brain lesions (white matter hypoperfusion injury, focal ischaemia, cerebral amyloid angiopathy) or reproduce VCI risk factors (old age, hypertension, hyperhomocysteinemia, high-salt/high-fat diet) or reproduce genetic causes of VCI (CADASIL-causing Notch3 mutations). CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that (1) translational models may reflect a VCI-relevant pathological process, while not fully replicating a human disease spectrum; (2) rodent models of VCI are limited by paucity of white matter; and (3) further translational models, and improved cognitive testing instruments, are required.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © The Author(s). 2017 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: Experimental models, In vivo models, Translational models, VCID, Vascular cognitive impairment, Vascular dementia, General & Internal Medicine, 11 Medical And Health Sciences
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute (MCS)
Journal or Publication Title: BMC Med
ISSN: 1741-7015
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
25 January 2017Published
12 January 2017Accepted
Publisher License: Creative Commons: Attribution 4.0
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
20140901Alzheimer's Drug Discovery FoundationUNSPECIFIED
PG146/151Alzheimer's SocietyUNSPECIFIED
PPG2014A-8Alzheimer's Research UKUNSPECIFIED
PubMed ID: 28118831
Go to PubMed abstract
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/108504
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12916-017-0793-9

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