SORA

Advancing, promoting and sharing knowledge of health through excellence in teaching, clinical practice and research into the prevention and treatment of illness

Bacterial vaginosis in female facility workers in north-western Tanzania: prevalence and risk factors

Baisley, K; Changalucha, J; Weiss, HA; Mugeye, K; Everett, D; Hambleton, I; Hay, P; Ross, D; Tanton, C; Chirwa, T; et al. Baisley, K; Changalucha, J; Weiss, HA; Mugeye, K; Everett, D; Hambleton, I; Hay, P; Ross, D; Tanton, C; Chirwa, T; Hayes, R; Watson-Jones, D (2009) Bacterial vaginosis in female facility workers in north-western Tanzania: prevalence and risk factors. SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS, 85 (5). 370 - 375. ISSN 1368-4973 https://doi.org/10.1136/sti.2008.035543
SGUL Authors: Hay, Phillip Edward

[img]
Preview
PDF Published Version
Available under License St George's repository terms & conditions.

Download (220kB) | Preview

Abstract

Objectives: To determine prevalence of, and risk factors for, bacterial vaginosis (BV) among herpes simplex virus (HSV) 2 seropositive Tanzanian women at enrolment into a randomised, placebo-controlled trial of HSV suppressive treatment. Methods: 1305 HSV-2 seropositive women aged 16–35 years working in bars, guesthouses and similar facilities were interviewed, examined and tested for HIV, syphilis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, BV, candidiasis and trichomoniasis. Factors associated with BV were analysed using logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Results: BV prevalence was 62.9%; prevalence of Nugent score 9–10 was 16.1%. Independent risk factors for BV were work facility type, fewer dependents, increasing alcohol consumption, sex in the last week (adjusted OR 2.03; 95% CI 1.57 to 2.62), using cloths or cotton wool for menstrual hygiene, HIV (adjusted OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.83) and Trichomonas vaginalis infection. There was no association between BV and the frequency or method of vaginal cleansing. However, BV was less prevalent among women who reported inserting sub- stances to dry the vagina for sex (adjusted OR 0.44; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.75). Conclusion: BV was extremely prevalent among our study population of HSV-2 positive female facility workers in North-western Tanzania. Although recent sex was associated with increased BV prevalence, vaginal drying was associated with lower BV prevalence. Further studies of the effects of specific practices on vaginal flora are warranted.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Adolescent, Adult, Animals, Chlamydia trachomatis, Female, Gonorrhea, HIV Infections, HIV-1, Herpesvirus 2, Human, Humans, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Sexual Behavior, Syphilis, Tanzania, Trichomonas Infections, Trichomonas vaginalis, Vagina, Vaginal Douching, Vaginosis, Bacterial, Young Adult, Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Infectious Diseases, INFECTIOUS DISEASES, SIMPLEX-VIRUS TYPE-2, VAGINAL FLORA, HIV-INFECTION, WOMEN, ACQUISITION, ASSOCIATION, SUSCEPTIBILITY, LACTOBACILLI, DISEASE, SYMPTOMS, Public Health, 1103 Clinical Sciences, 1117 Public Health And Health Services, 1108 Medical Microbiology
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Infection and Immunity Research Institute (INII)
Journal or Publication Title: SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
ISSN: 1368-4973
Related URLs:
Dates:
DateEvent
26 May 2009Published
Web of Science ID: WOS:000270082500013
URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/107193
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1136/sti.2008.035543

Actions (login required)

Edit Item Edit Item