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Coronary artery endothelial dysfunction is positively correlated with low density lipoprotein and inversely correlated with high density lipoprotein subclass particles measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Ford, MA; McConnell, JP; Lavi, S; Rihal, CS; Prasad, A; Sandhu, GS; Hartman, SJ; Lerman, LO; Lerman, A (2009) Coronary artery endothelial dysfunction is positively correlated with low density lipoprotein and inversely correlated with high density lipoprotein subclass particles measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Atherosclerosis, 207 (1). pp. 111-115. ISSN 1879-1484 https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.04.039
SGUL Authors: Prasad, Abhiram

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The association between cholesterol and endothelial dysfunction remains controversial. We tested the hypothesis that lipoprotein subclasses are associated with coronary endothelial dysfunction. METHODS AND RESULTS: Coronary endothelial function was assessed in 490 patients between November 1993 and February 2007. Fasting lipids and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) lipoprotein particle subclasses were measured. There were 325 females and 165 males with a mean age of 49.8+/-11.6 years. Coronary endothelial dysfunction (epicardial constriction>20% or increase in coronary blood flow<50% in response to intracoronary acetylcholine) was diagnosed in 273 patients, the majority of whom (64.5%) had microvascular dysfunction. Total cholesterol and LDL-C (low density lipoprotein cholesterol) were not associated with endothelial dysfunction. One-way analysis and multivariate methods adjusting for age, gender, diabetes, hypertension and lipid-lowering agent use were used to determine the correlation between lipoprotein subclasses and coronary endothelial dysfunction. Epicardial endothelial dysfunction was significantly correlated with total (p=0.03) and small LDLp (LDL particles) (p<0.01) and inversely correlated with total and large HDLp (high density lipoprotein particles) (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Epicardial, but not microvascular, coronary endothelial dysfunction was associated directly with LDL particles and inversely with HDL particles, suggesting location-dependent impact of lipoprotein particles on the coronary circulation.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. Author's manuscript used with permission from the publisher.
Keywords: Acetylcholine, Adult, Aged, Biological Markers, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Circulation, Coronary Vessels, Endothelium, Vascular, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Male, Microcirculation, Middle Aged, Particle Size, Vasodilation, Vasodilator Agents, Young Adult, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Lipoprotein particles, Endothelial dysfunction, Atherosclerosis, Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Peripheral Vascular Disease, Cardiovascular System & Cardiology, PERIPHERAL VASCULAR DISEASE, Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Lipoprotein particles, Endothelial dysfunction, METABOLIC SYNDROME, CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE, HEALTHY WOMEN, HEART-DISEASE, EPIC-NORFOLK, SIZE, LDL, RISK, NUMBER, MEN, Cardiovascular System & Hematology, 1103 Clinical Sciences, 1102 Cardiovascular Medicine And Haematology
SGUL Research Institute / Research Centre: Academic Structure > Molecular and Clinical Sciences Research Institute (MCS) > Cardiac (INCCCA)
Journal or Publication Title: Atherosclerosis
ISSN: 1879-1484
Language: eng
Dates:
DateEvent
November 2009Published
Projects:
Project IDFunderFunder ID
K24 HL069840NHLBI NIH HHSUNSPECIFIED
K24 HL069840-05NHLBI NIH HHSUNSPECIFIED
R01 AG031750NIA NIH HHSUNSPECIFIED
R01 HL063911NHLBI NIH HHSUNSPECIFIED
R01 HL063911-04NHLBI NIH HHSUNSPECIFIED
R01 HL092954NHLBI NIH HHSUNSPECIFIED
PubMed ID: 19515370
Web of Science ID: WOS:000272460700017
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URI: http://openaccess.sgul.ac.uk/id/eprint/102796
Publisher's version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.04.039

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